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Linking Sleep Apnea to Sexual Dysfunction…

June 28, 2012

There’s been a lot of hype recently over the release of a new medical study, linking sleep apnea and erectile dysfunction and/or decreased sexual performance. In this study conducted at the Walter Reed Military National Medical Center in Bethesda, ninety-two men with an average age of 46 were observed. All of the members of the group were diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), treated, and followed for six months. The results concluded that after being treated for sleep apnea over a period of time, erectile dysfunction was eliminated in about forty percent of those who initially reported it. Others with a reduced to normal libido also experienced a boost in sexual performance. Overall, sexual function and satisfaction were improved in the majority of non-diabetic men in the study, regardless of their level of initial erectile dysfunction.

OSA is a sleep related breathing disorder that occurs when the tissue in the back of the throat collapses and blocks the airway, causing the body to stop breathing during sleep. In addition to being linked with decreased sexual performance, OSA can increase the risk of stroke, hypertension, diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart attack. It can also significantly decrease the survival rate of cancer patients with untreated sleep apnea.

The information from the aforementioned medical study further illustrates the relevance of treating sleep apnea and the impact of the disorder when left untreated. It is commonly known that severe untreated sleep apnea sufferers face an increased mortality risk.  However, emphasis should also be placed on the everyday quality of life for everyone struggling with the sleep disorder. There are numerous challenges and struggles for those with untreated sleep apnea – both in the long run of physical health and the everyday impact of social and emotional well-being.

If you or someone you know show noticeable signs of sleep apnea such as snoring, gasping for air during sleep, and/or daytime fatigue, please visit sleeptest.com for a free online screening and call us immediately for help.

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